LA Opera: Die Zauberflöte (2013)

The Reviews are in. LA Opera’s production of Die Zauberflöte was a smashing success.

Janai Brugger is a perfect Pamina. Her arias are as clear as a mountain stream.
– Jim Farber, Press-Telegram (Read Article)

Janai Brugger is a rapturous Pamina ready for prime time.
– Mark Swed, LA Times

Janai Brugger let loose a shimmering soprano. When she sings of her loss of love’s happiness in her Act Two aria, she caresses each line with tenderness, and the effect is exquisitely heartbreaking.
– Jane Rosenberg, Seen and Heard International (Read Article)

The rising soprano Janai Brugger, tone creamy and phrasing elegant, found feeling within the constraints of the production’s stylization, her hair in an Expressionist-era Louise Brooks bob and her body flinching eloquently under the burden of Pamina’s suffering.
– Zachary Woolfe, The New York Times

…every exquisite second of singing by rising L.A. Opera star Janai Brugger — her solo inside a cartoon snowglobe was the heartrending high point of the evening.
– Tim Appelo, The Hollywood Reporter (Read Article)

As Pamina in Los Angeles Opera’s silent-film-inspired production of Mozart’s “The Magic Flute” last month, the elegant, creamy-toned soprano Janai Brugger, 30, embraced the production’s constraints — all movements had to be synchronized with stage-filling animations — without compromising the tender force of her personality. It was a performance… that was the apotheosis of the 30-something, with both the freshness of youth and the depth of age.
– Zachary Woolfe, The New York Times (Read Article)

Up-and-coming soprano Janai Brugger proved the musical highlight of opening night, as she managed to bring a stunning passion and control to her Pamina, Tamino’s would-be lover – even while being attacked by cartoon dogs or posing in an animated snowfall. Her “Ach, ich fuhl’s” was superb.
– Marc Porter Zasada, The Huffington Post (Read Article)

The rising soprano Janai Brugger, tone creamy and phrasing elegant, found feeling within the constraints of the production’s stylization, her hair in an Expressionist-era Louise Brooks bob and her body flinching eloquently under the burden of Pamina’s suffering.
– Zachary Woolfe, The New York Times(Read Article)

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